5 Easy Steps to Hire Commission-Only Sales Reps

hire commission-only sales reps

1. Identify what type of commission-only sales reps you want to hire

There are many different types of commission-only sales reps. The type you need will depend on the industry in which your company operates and what you’re looking for in a commission-only representative.

For example, if you work in retail, then it’s important that your potential candidate have experience with customer service and merchandising. If you want someone to sell leads or other products online, then they should know how to use a computer well enough to understand the product and demonstrate how it works.

The more specific details about what type of commission-only sales rep will best suit your needs, the easier time you’ll have finding them!

Go ahead and make a list now of qualities you want to see in a rep to improve their chance of success.

2. Determine how much money you are willing to spend on a sales rep

Now comes the big question: How much are you willing to spend on a commission-only representative? Like all expenses with work, cost takes into account more than just one thing. For example, if you want someone to represent your company in person at trade shows or other events that require them to wear a suit and tie, then it will be more expensive than hiring somebody who can work from their home office.

The good news is that while there are many considerations when selecting commission-only representatives, the better prepared you are, the easier it will be to find one that fits your needs.

When in doubt, go for a commission-only rep who works from home, and pay them the industry standard or slightly above. You can attract great people with this type of offer, and they’ll often be more affordable than those who work from an office as you’ll have low overhead and supporting costs.

Since you won’t be paying the rep unless they are making sales, don’t be afraid to offer attractive compensation plans to bring in the best reps. The different between a good rep and a great one are your profit margins.

3. Create a list of the skills and qualifications that your ideal candidate will have

qualifications for a commission only sales rep

The more specific you are about your needs for a commission-only representative, the easier time you’ll have hiring one.

For example, if there are certain qualities that they need to have in order to sell leads and other products online (i.e., computer skills) then create a list of those qualifications and skills as well as the ones you want them to have in order to represent your company at trade shows (i.e., experience with customer service and merchandising).

It’s important that they meet all of the qualifications, but if there are a few those skills or qualifications that aren’t as critical for the position, then perhaps you can waive these requirements during the hiring process.

The following are a few qualities to look for when searching for the ideal commission-only representative:

* Experience with customer service and merchandising – If this person is going to be representing you in retail, they will need these skills so that they can engage customers and showcase your products.

* Computer skills – This is important if they will be selling leads or other products online.

* Passion for your product – If this person doesn’t love what you offer, why should anyone else? The more passionate and excited about the goods and services that a commission-only representative has, the better their performance in sales.

* Ability to work from home – This is a huge plus. There are no distractions, and they can work at their own pace without worrying about being late to an office job.

* Drive for success – When it comes down to it, what really matters is whether or not the commission-only representative that you hire will be driven enough to find customers on their own. If they don’t have the motivation or enthusiasm to succeed, then they won’t be able to help you meet your goals.

* Ability to learn on the job – Hiring a commission-only representative can sometimes mean risking them not having specific skills that are needed for a position if they’re just starting out in business and never held another sales position before.

Go ahead and make your list now. It will look different for everyone. If you’re having a hard time, think about a rep who is currently on your team and the qualities they display. If this is your first time hiring, take a look at a competitor who is doing well and see how their reps present themselves to the world. Try to emulate the best qualities you see in successful competitors.

4. Advertise for your job opening in local newspapers, online classifieds, or with staffing agencies

finding commission-only sales reps

There are a variety of ways that you can advertise for your job opening as well.

For example, if money is tight and resources are limited (i.e., you don’t have the time or budget to post an ad on every site), then hiring someone through staffing agencies will be more cost-efficient than advertising in local newspapers or online classifieds. Don’t forget about one of the best ways to find reps, which is absolutely free. Post on social media.

Be sure to check out sales professional groups where representatives congregate, as well as industry specific groups where you’ll find reps with insider industry knowledge and experience.

The choice of where you recruit will really depend on your company’s needs and the amount of time you’re willing to invest in finding a commission-only representative. Most people tend to post job openings locally so that they can interview candidates face-to-face, but this is not always necessary if there are many qualified applicants who live out of state.

Possible Ad:

Hiring Commission-Only Representative for Local Business!

We’re looking to hire a salesperson who can work from home and sell our product online as well as at trade shows around the country. You’ll need experience with customer service, merchandising, computer skills and will be expected to be outgoing and passionate about what we offer. We are currently looking for someone who can work at least 30-40 hours per week with the possibility of more if they’re driven enough to find their own clients each day. Please send your resume, along with a cover letter that explains why you would be interested in this position, to us by midnight on March 15th.

Go write up and post your job description now. I recommend you start with one location, and then tweak the job post after getting feedback to better attract the reps who will be a good fit in the next place you post.

5. Interview each applicant for the position and ask them questions about their experience, background, and interests

Interviewing is always important when you’re looking for a commission-only representative.

The more you know about their background, the better decision that you’ll be able to make with regards to whether or not they will be able to work well in your company and help meet your goals. There are many questions that one might ask a potential commission-only representative, including:

*How would you describe yourself?

*What are your strengths and weaknesses as an employee?

*Why do you want to work for our company in particular? What type of position interests you the most? If that’s not possible because we don’t have any open positions at this time, what is your ideal position?

*What’s been the most difficult thing you’ve had to do in a job before this one and how did you deal with it?

*Can we contact any references of yours for us to speak to about your work ethic, honesty, and integrity when working within a team environment?

Many hiring managers might ask a potential commission-only representative, “What is your ideal position?” or “Why do you want to work for our company in particular? What type of position interests you the most?” For example, if they said that their major interest was event planning and we had an opening on our events team at this time, then I would be more inclined to hire them.

The most important thing is that you’re able to communicate clearly with your commission-only representative and trust their judgement while they are working for you. They should know how much responsibility they have in order to complete tasks, what the company’s expectations of them are, and where there might be room for improvement (if there is room for improvement).

Like the hiring post, create a working document that you can tweak over time with the questions you need to ask to determine if the rep is a good fit.

6. Review applicants’ resumes and select one person for the position based on their qualifications

Choosing a sales rep

When you’re looking for a commission-only representative, it’s important to review their resume and select the one person that has the most qualifications. You should also make sure they have good customer service skills (or are at least willing to learn), because this is what will be required of them in order to get clients on board with our company.

7. Test out the reps


But ultimately, hiring a high-performing commission-only sales rep comes down to this: performance. You won’t know who is a great long term fit until you try them out. I recommend you bring on 3-4 reps for every 1 A-player rep that you want to keep. Give them all a test run, let them compete against each other and keep the winner. Do that 3 or 4 times and you can build a team of 4 high-perfoming reps who can consistently grow sales in your company.

Since the reps are paid on commission, incentives are aligned. When they win, you win and vice versa. That’s the beauty of commission only.

Don’t forget to train or hire a sales manager to support the reps and keep everyone’s performance high. The worst thing you could do is find the perfect fit and have them leave because you aren’t managing the team properly.

Go out there, start your search and keep looking until you find the one. The hunt is worth the prize.

Don’t forget to plug your reps in to Glance to ensure high performance with less time from you.

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